Street food in Jakarta

To really get to know a city, you have to hit the streets. Beneath the shadows of the city skyline, the roads beat out a rhythm of daily life.

 

MORE THAN FOOD.  From mobile food carts to large centers, there's something to discover at every turn

 MORE THAN FOOD. From mobile food carts to large centers, there’s something to discover at every turn.

Jakarta has a rich and diverse street food culture. foot five – mobile carts that sell small dishes merienda (afternoon snack) fare, usually fried – are a familiar sight outside schools, offices, and around the neighborhood. For bigger meals and late night hangouts, look to the popular street food centers in areas such as Sabang, Bloc M, or Pecenongan Street.

BEHIND THE COUNTER.  Where the magic happens

 BEHIND THE COUNTER. Where the magic happens

In These roadside kiosks, Including famous Indonesian dishes nasi goreng (fried rice) , satay (meat skewers), and chicken meatballs noodles (noodle soup with chicken meatballs) Compete for attention alongside local favorites such as martabak (stuffed pancakes) and Medanese buns .

Though extremely tasty, street food in Jakarta is not for the faint of heart – or for the faint of stomach! For one thing, Indonesians take very seriously Reviews their spices. Chile consumption is practically a national Pastime: unless you specify otherwise, they’ll Assume you’re a champ.

Even if you can handle the heat, street food in Jakarta is not renowned for its cleanliness. Come equipped with a cast-iron belly and a formidable immune system.

Here is a sampling of common dishes you will find on the streets of Jakarta. From after-school snacks to butter-rich desserts to recognizable Asian standbys, Jakarta’s street food culture truly has something for everyone.

Satay

SATAY.  How many can you eat?

 SATAY. How many can you eat?

Like many other Southeast Asian countries, satay is a staple dish in Indonesia.Popular meats are chicken, beef, goat, and mutton.

Fried

Snacktime.  In another part of the world, a bag of potato chips.  In Indonesia, fries, anyone?

Fried (fritters) is a general term for an assortment of fried snacks, taken from the word fried the which means “to fry.” These are typically sold in the roaming leg five , and the make a perfect snack.

Common types of fried foods include: fried tempeh (crispy battered tempeh slices) fried bananas (banana fritters), fried tofu (fried cubes of tofu), sweet corn fritters, and one of my personal favorites, bakwan (battered vegetable fritters).

Field buns

FIELD buns.  An Indonesian take on the Chinese buns

 FIELD buns. An Indonesian take on the Chinese buns

This Indonesian Chinese steamed buns take on are a popular snack for people on the go. They can be filled with traditional fillings like beef or chicken, or sweet fillings like nuts, chocolate, and beans. Every region of prizes its own version, but the dumplings from Medan is highly regarded for having a soft, airy dough.

Cake Ape (Ape Cake)

RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APE (CAKES).  The green color is from pandan flavoring

RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APE (CAKES). The green color is from pandan flavoring

I used to buy a bag of Reviews These flat, strange-looking cakes after school to nibble on till dinner. A colorful snack that is as fun to eat as it looks, cake ape (pronounced AH-Peh) has a crispy, crepe-like edge and a soft, chewy center made of coconut milk, flour, and sugar. The green color comes from pandan flavoring.

Its resemblance to a certain female anatomical part has earned it the nickname of cake tete, the which needs no translation.

Brain Brain Fish

BRAIN-BRAIN.  Prepare for a sensory explosion

BRAIN-BRAIN. Prepare for a sensory explosion

Brain brain is a savory fish cake wrapped in banana leaves then grilled over charcoal. Though fish cake is popular across Southeast Asia, Jakarta’s brain brain ranks Among the best in the country. Dip the cake into a spicy peanut sauce, Jakarta-style, and prepare for a sensory explosion.

Martabak

IN PROGRESS.  Some vendors have secret recipes for Reviews their versions of martabak

IN PROGRESS. Some vendors have secret recipes for Reviews their versions of martabak

Street vendors and citizens alike take Reviews their martabak very seriously, with some shops keeping Reviews their famous recipes for the giant stuffed pancakes a closely guarded secret. Our family headed to Martabak 65 in Pecenongan martabak Street for the best in town.

GOOD EATS.  Nutella in your martabak - why not?

Mie Aceh (Aceh Noodles)

WARM UP.  A flavorful bowl of noodles hits the spot

WARM UP. A flavorful bowl of noodles hits the spot

Street food vendors enjoy creating Reviews their own versions of classic Indonesian food. Dishes like fried noodles (fried noodles) and chicken soup (spicy chicken noodle soup) are Universally loved and sold almost anywhere, but they’ll taste different every time!

 

Advertisements

12 Comments

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s